General Discussions

HCC and RxHCC Guidelines

 
Picture of Jill Lo, CPC-A
HCC and RxHCC Guidelines
by Jill Lo, CPC-A - Thursday, 27 July 2017, 3:21 PM
 

Hi there friends!

I've gotten an invitation to test for OS2 to do HCC coding, and I'm trying to find info on the specific guidelines that govern HCC and RxHCC coding.  I've searched the internet and found some helpful information, but nothing like a specific set of guidelines like in ICD-10.  Does something like that exist?  I'd appreciate any info from anyone who does this type of coding.  Thanks so much! :)

Picture of Sylvia Mi
Re: HCC and RxHCC Guidelines
by Sylvia Mi - Friday, 28 July 2017, 10:49 AM
 

Hi, Jill

The company will provide you with client-specific guidelines.  They will vary depending on the client/contract.  Hope this helps!

Picture of Summer Pa, CCS, CPC-A
Re: HCC and RxHCC Guidelines
by Summer Pa, CCS, CPC-A - Friday, 28 July 2017, 12:43 PM
 

Hi Jill,

Is this job remote?

Picture of Amber Lo, CPC-A
Re: HCC and RxHCC Guidelines
by Amber Lo, CPC-A - Friday, 28 July 2017, 2:05 PM
 

Congratulations Jill on your invitation to test for a position with OS2!  Best of luck to you!  Keep us posted on the outcome.

Amber

Picture of Jill Lo, CPC-A
Re: HCC and RxHCC Guidelines
by Jill Lo, CPC-A - Sunday, 30 July 2017, 10:20 AM
 

Thanks Sylvia!  So does that mean for the test I follow the ICD10 guidelines that I've been following all along?  

Summer, I think it is remote but the email didn't specify.  I applied on their website which said the training was on-site until you were ready to be released to remote.  So my plan is, depending on the rate of pay they offer, is to go to Texas, where their office is located, do the training then work from home once released,  Right now I just want to get a feel for HCC coding and what it entails, test for the company, then make further decisions based on what's offered.  I also posted my resume on Glassdoor and Careerbuilder and had a recruiter call me just this last Friday, we are in the beginning steps with that process, just had an informal interview about my work experience, what I'm looking for, etc., and he said he's going to start looking for me so that's another place you could start if you're having trouble in your search.  I work for a company that has a medical coding division, nThrive (formerly Precyse) and they're not CPC-A friendly at all, which was a surprise to me because when I first hired with them it was with the intent to transfer to their coding division and the recruiter even made it seem like that was something that many MT's did at that company.  When I tried to apply and transfer I got a curt letter stating that I didn't have the experience or credential (CPC without the A) that was necessary.  That stung a bit, you'd think my being an employee in good standing with a long medical background would count but, oh well.  Got my first rejection out of the way, lol!  To be honest, these companies have client-specific requirements, so that's understandable.  I'm just going to keep on keeping on, lol! Newbies ARE getting jobs, though, so I'm not losing hope.  The first job is the hardest, after that we're on Easy Street lol :)

Picture of Jill Lo, CPC-A
Re: HCC and RxHCC Guidelines
by Jill Lo, CPC-A - Sunday, 30 July 2017, 10:21 AM
 

Thanks Amber!  I'll for sure keep you posted :)

Picture of Wendy Va, CCS, COC, CPC, CRC
Re: HCC and RxHCC Guidelines
by Wendy Va, CCS, COC, CPC, CRC - Sunday, 30 July 2017, 3:49 PM
 

Hi Jill, I agree with Sylvia, the company will give you client-specific guidelines for the HCC work they are contracted to do. HCC companies like to hire beginning coders with their CPC-A because they are green and they can train them to do the HCC work correctly. I have worked for several different HCC companies and it is not the kind of work I like. It is seasonal work, with the promise of full time but there is always downtime for most of these companies. They like to keep a handful of coders in the back pocket so when the work does come in they can get it done quickly and get ready for the next project to come through. When that project is completed, the coders sit back waiting for more work. It is a feast or famine mindset, not a very stable type of work to do long term. It is great if you want to do it part time or to pick up extra money or to work your "A" off. No stability from what I have found. You will still apply the concepts you have learned from coding school and follow all of the ICD-10 guidelines but it is a different kind of beast, HCC coding. I found it extremely boring and will never do it again. You just sit around looking for ICD-10 codes in a bunch of charts all day. They like for you to do 5 patients/charts an hour, but honestly some of these patients charts can be 10 pages or several hundred pages long. I found it a bit unrealistic when the patient's chart exceeded 200 pages or more. Remember, these are notes for the whole year, not one day, which can be inpatient/outpatient/rehab/radiology/all specialties for just one patient and you are required to do about 3-5 patients an hour. I just want to give you the full scoop on HCC coding. Some people love this kind of work and some people don't. I wish the best to you in your job interview. It is definitely a good start to get your foot in the door for coding. The pay is pretty good as well. So, I have given you the pros and cons from my perspective. Wendy